Beethoven: Symphony No. 3- Eroica Dec. 1944 Strauss: Don Juan

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3- Eroica Dec. 1944 Strauss: Don Juan

$16

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3- Eroica Dec. 1944 Strauss: Don Juan

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3- Eroica Dec. 1944 Strauss: Don Juan:either pick up the phone and give us a call direct or get online and send us an e-message. however you contact us, we'll aim to sort out any problem you have as quickly and effectively as possible. I am not sure whether this CD package has the photographs or not. It is possible I have this recording in another packaging where there are "before" and "after" pictures of the hall where this recording was made.The "before" picture shows the hall in its German romantic splendor -- the coffers, the soaring doric columns, etc., all glowing and shining, showing the invisible patina, perhaps, of many great performances it had witnessed. The "after" picture is from days after the recording, showing the hall in ruins, victim of Allied bombs.And it is these two photographs which sum up the essence of this recording -- the glory of German romanticism immediately juxtaposed with the tragedy of World War II (and Nazism, Communism, etc.). Caught somewhere in between is this glorious blast, this shining last testament, as it were, like the raving words of a dying man -- like Beethoven's own supposed deathbed gesture, shaking his fist at a lightning bolt.Perhaps a more serious or less emotive critic (a Heinrich Schenker, perhaps, one of Furtwangler's mentors) would take me to task for the tone of this review, but this recording takes on all sorts of extra-musical associations in this context. Surely the music itself, with its obviously martial gestures, its staccato dissonances, its association even in the mind of the composer with a military leader (Bonaparte), lends to this notion.But aside from the photographs, or the timing of the recording (December 1944), this performance has many extraordinary things to recommend it.A single example will suffice. Immediately before the coda of the first movement, there is an extended piano passage, where the basses sort of lope along under the strings in broad arch-like figures. Furtwangler -- whose rubato is always remarked on -- holds the tempo back. As the passage grows in intensity and volume, he gradually lets the throttle out, and by the point right before the coda, where the trumpets are re-entering, the headlong momentum is unstoppable. The tempo pushes forward and forward, impossibly so, and the coda becomes a great scream of victory, like the voices of an army falling on their hapless foe.The incredible part is that he got a hundred or so musicians to execute this, all together, with such precision and clarity of direction. There are many recordings of this symphony -- none like this one.phoenix mall,cheap sale,max 82% offBeethoven: Symphony No. 3- Eroica Dec. 1944 Strauss: Don Juan
WE MOVE. YOU WIN.
|||
Hanover MANDN9PCSWSQ-8 Manor 9 Piece Large Square Table and EighSportides Boy's 3 Pack Dry Fit Sport Short Sleeve T-Shirt TshirtTablecraft Salad Dressing Shaker, Glass with Plastic Metal PouWINGONEER DIY 1.75Mm Remote Proximity All-Metal Reprap Bulldog EBali: Music for the Gong GedeW7 | Faux Mink False Strip Lashes | 5 Reuseable Styles - Wispy,EPHYTECH 5 in 1 Erector Set, Toy Car Building Kit, 136 PCS STEMTeeHee Little Girls and Toddler Cute Novelty and Fashion Cotton
Christopher Knight Home 305511 Amelia Outdoor 18" Water Resistan
Learn Climb Science Kit for Kids - 21 Experiments Science Set,
(30) Galvanized Hex Head 3/8 x 12" Lag Bolts Wood Screws
Ciglow 4-Inch Grille Audio Speaker Cover,2-Piece Speaker Protect
Music of Gambuh Theater
Krakow Ghetto Notebook
Giantex Folding Camping Chair Moon Saucer Chair Lightweight Sofa
ANFEI Lubricant, Water Based Lube 30ML-6Pack
Hanover MANDN9PCSWSQ-8 Manor 9 Piece Large Square Table and EighSportides Boy's 3 Pack Dry Fit Sport Short Sleeve T-Shirt TshirtTablecraft Salad Dressing Shaker, Glass with Plastic Metal PouWINGONEER DIY 1.75Mm Remote Proximity All-Metal Reprap Bulldog EBali: Music for the Gong GedeW7 | Faux Mink False Strip Lashes | 5 Reuseable Styles - Wispy,EPHYTECH 5 in 1 Erector Set, Toy Car Building Kit, 136 PCS STEMTeeHee Little Girls and Toddler Cute Novelty and Fashion Cotton
Christopher Knight Home 305511 Amelia Outdoor 18" Water Resistan
Learn Climb Science Kit for Kids - 21 Experiments Science Set,
(30) Galvanized Hex Head 3/8 x 12" Lag Bolts Wood Screws
Ciglow 4-Inch Grille Audio Speaker Cover,2-Piece Speaker Protect
Music of Gambuh Theater
Krakow Ghetto Notebook
Giantex Folding Camping Chair Moon Saucer Chair Lightweight Sofa
ANFEI Lubricant, Water Based Lube 30ML-6Pack

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3- Eroica Dec. 1944 Strauss: Don Juan

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3- Eroica Dec. 1944 Strauss: Don Juan:either pick up the phone and give us a call direct or get online and send us an e-message. however you contact us, we'll aim to sort out any problem you have as quickly and effectively as possible. I am not sure whether this CD package has the photographs or not. It is possible I have this recording in another packaging where there are "before" and "after" pictures of the hall where this recording was made.The "before" picture shows the hall in its German romantic splendor -- the coffers, the soaring doric columns, etc., all glowing and shining, showing the invisible patina, perhaps, of many great performances it had witnessed. The "after" picture is from days after the recording, showing the hall in ruins, victim of Allied bombs.And it is these two photographs which sum up the essence of this recording -- the glory of German romanticism immediately juxtaposed with the tragedy of World War II (and Nazism, Communism, etc.). Caught somewhere in between is this glorious blast, this shining last testament, as it were, like the raving words of a dying man -- like Beethoven's own supposed deathbed gesture, shaking his fist at a lightning bolt.Perhaps a more serious or less emotive critic (a Heinrich Schenker, perhaps, one of Furtwangler's mentors) would take me to task for the tone of this review, but this recording takes on all sorts of extra-musical associations in this context. Surely the music itself, with its obviously martial gestures, its staccato dissonances, its association even in the mind of the composer with a military leader (Bonaparte), lends to this notion.But aside from the photographs, or the timing of the recording (December 1944), this performance has many extraordinary things to recommend it.A single example will suffice. Immediately before the coda of the first movement, there is an extended piano passage, where the basses sort of lope along under the strings in broad arch-like figures. Furtwangler -- whose rubato is always remarked on -- holds the tempo back. As the passage grows in intensity and volume, he gradually lets the throttle out, and by the point right before the coda, where the trumpets are re-entering, the headlong momentum is unstoppable. The tempo pushes forward and forward, impossibly so, and the coda becomes a great scream of victory, like the voices of an army falling on their hapless foe.The incredible part is that he got a hundred or so musicians to execute this, all together, with such precision and clarity of direction. There are many recordings of this symphony -- none like this one.phoenix mall,cheap sale,max 82% offBeethoven: Symphony No. 3- Eroica Dec. 1944 Strauss: Don Juan